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Diogo Costa on Brazil

 From my email, via Gonzalo Schwartz: The country ranks third globally in consuming information via digital platforms, a landscape that cultivates distrust in public institutions and ignites social unrest. This has fostered a rise in right-wing populism, including the election of former president Jair Bolsonaro, intensifying what Martin Gurri describes as a ‘crisis of authority.’  Efforts
The post Diogo Costa on Brazil appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION. 

From my email, via Gonzalo Schwartz:

The country ranks third globally in consuming information via digital platforms, a landscape that cultivates distrust in public institutions and ignites social unrest. This has fostered a rise in right-wing populism, including the election of former president Jair Bolsonaro, intensifying what Martin Gurri describes as a ‘crisis of authority.’  Efforts to counter this crisis, however, further destabilize Brazil’s democracy. 

Supreme Court Justice Alexandre de Moraes exemplifies this turmoil with his controversial measures, including arbitrary digital content removalousting elected officials, and implementing unprecedented surveillance. Moraes and his peers have been criticized for investigating entrepreneurs and freezing assets over alleged anti-democratic private messagesprobing executives from Google and Telegram for supposed disinformation campaignsrevoking passports of foreign journalists, and censoring a film about then-president Jair Bolsonaro. 

The government’s endorsement of these measures amplifies the crisis. It has established a “National Attorney’s Office for the Defense of Democracy” to combat disinformation, while introducing a contested “fact-checking” platform. The Federal Prosecutor’s Office recently requested user data from followers of former President Jair Bolsonaro across major social media platforms to aid their investigation into anti-democratic activities. 

Two key anti-corruption figures, Senator Sergio Moro, an ex-judge, and Representative Deltan Dallagnol, a former prosecutor, are under increased political assault. Accused of colluding in past investigations, they now face political retribution. Dallagnol has already been ousted from Congress by Brazil’s electoral court, and many speculate that Moro will follow suit. Their plight was summed up by President Lula’s statement, “I will only feel well when I f*ck with Moro”. 

These high-profile cases are emblematic of a broader collapse of Brazil’s anti-corruption efforts. Initiatives like Operation Car Wash, which reclaimed R$3.28 billion out of R$6.2 billion in misappropriated funds, are now being undermined by political backlash. This underscores the urgent need for robust institutions that can effectively combat corruption without succumbing to political pressure. 

Brazil’s circumstances resonate regionally due to its leadership role. As Ian Bremmer recently stated, commenting on the Supreme Court making former president Jair Bolsonaro ineligible for the next eight years, “Brazil [is] setting the standard for U.S. democracy”. This political meddling could influence other countries, potentially eroding the rule of law in other democracies. 

Strengthening Brazil’s commitment to the rule of law transcends national borders — it’s a regional imperative. The advantages span from curbing corruption to advancing large infrastructure projects unimpeded by interference, as well as bolstering economic relationships given Brazil’s significant role in regional trade.

The post Diogo Costa on Brazil appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

 Current Affairs, Political Science 

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Diogo Costa on Brazil

Diogo Costa on Brazil

 From my email, via Gonzalo Schwartz: The country ranks third globally in

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