Impact of major awards on the subsequent work of their recipients

 To characterize the impact of major research awards on recipients’ subsequent work, we studied Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Physics and MacArthur Fellows working in scientific fields. Using a case-crossover design, we compared scientists’ citations, publications and citations-per-publication from work published in a 3-year pre-award period to their work published in
The post Impact of major awards on the subsequent work of their recipients appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION. 

To characterize the impact of major research awards on recipients’ subsequent work, we studied Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Physics and MacArthur Fellows working in scientific fields. Using a case-crossover design, we compared scientists’ citations, publications and citations-per-publication from work published in a 3-year pre-award period to their work published in a 3-year post-award period. Nobel Laureates and MacArthur Fellows received fewer citations for post- than for pre-award work. This was driven mostly by Nobel Laureates. Median decrease was 80.5 citations among Nobel Laureates (p = 0.004) and 2 among MacArthur Fellows (p = 0.857). Mid-career (42–57 years) and senior (greater than 57 years) researchers tended to earn fewer citations for post-award work. Early career researchers (less than 42 years, typically MacArthur Fellows) tended to earn more, but the difference was non-significant. MacArthur Fellows (p = 0.001) but not Nobel Laureates (p = 0.180) had significantly more post-award publications. Both populations had significantly fewer post-award citations per paper (p = 0.043 for Nobel Laureates, 0.005 for MacArthur Fellows, and 0.0004 for combined population). If major research awards indeed fail to increase (and even decrease) recipients’ impact, one may need to reassess the purposes, criteria, and impacts of awards to improve the scientific enterprise.

That is from a newly published paper by Andrew Nepomuceno, Hilary Bayer, and John P.A. Ioannidis, via Michelle Dawson.

The post Impact of major awards on the subsequent work of their recipients appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

 Science, Uncategorized 

Total
0
Shares
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Prev
Impact of major awards on the subsequent work of their recipients

Impact of major awards on the subsequent work of their recipients

 To characterize the impact of major research awards on recipients’ subsequent

Next
Public school choice programs in Los Angeles

Public school choice programs in Los Angeles

 Does a school district that expands school choice provide better outcomes for

You May Also Like